The Passion Translation: Content Review
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The Passion Translation: Content Review

An overview and rating of The Passion Translation (TPT)I don’t use generic labels but assess translations based on functional and formal criteria, including how much they reword the original language. Despite critics, I found TPT to be expectedly missionary in nature, combining a dynamic approach with considerable formal elements. While the translation’s charismatic roots and its translator’s claims generate controversy, I suggest that readers approach TPT like any other translation—by recognizing its biases and comparing it with others for a fuller understanding.

Review of The Passion Translation Part I – The Hype
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Review of The Passion Translation Part I – The Hype

The evaluation of a Bible translation hinges on various factors including theological perspectives and language familiarity. Controversy often arises over word choice, as seen in Romans 3:25’s varying translations of “propitiation.” Differing translation strategies result in diverse renderings, which can align with or challenge doctrinal positions. I encourage comparing translations and checking translator qualifications. Don’t assume “literal” means “accurate.” Instead, make use of multiple translations for a fuller understanding.

A Problem in Translation: Isaiah 3:12
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A Problem in Translation: Isaiah 3:12

Translation challenges Bible translators face, focusing on Isaiah 3:12’s varying interpretations. The passage’s meaning shifts depending on what textual choices one makes and whether one translates literally or figuratively, potentially impacting the modern reader’s understanding. Ultimately, translation choices reflect what translators deem most crucial to convey, with any decision risking some loss of the original message.

The NIV Study Bible (Fully Revised Edition
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The NIV Study Bible (Fully Revised Edition

(I’m writing as a #BibleGatewayPartner and a member of the #BGBloggerGrid. See note at the end of this post.) When a book that I generally like undergoes a revision, I approach it with a bit of trepidation. Is it going to match the older edition? Will it be better? Or maybe it will lose all…

Link: Mounce on Translation and Verbal Inspiration
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Link: Mounce on Translation and Verbal Inspiration

While I disagree with a number of minor points, the one major one being that I would not use the word “verbal” in describing inspiration, this is an excellent outline of how Bible translators think and the reasons behind that thinking. The author, William D. Mounce, responds in some cases to Grudem, but the article…

Galatians 2:16 – A Problem in Translation and Theology
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Galatians 2:16 – A Problem in Translation and Theology

I wanted to write a quick note here as this relates to my study tonight, as well as illustrating quite a number of translation problems. Here is our text, with CEV (NOT CEB) to the left, NRSV in the center as a “literal” comparison, and NLT to the right. I’m copying the NRSV notes as…

Translating Metaphors and the NLT of Isaiah 43:2
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Translating Metaphors and the NLT of Isaiah 43:2

I am very slow to criticize translations in broad terms. Every time I point out what I consider to be a problematic rendering in some Bible translation, someone will ask me if they should discard that version in exchange for a more accurate one. Any translation will contain renderings that can be questioned. In many…

A Note on Translations and Commentaries
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A Note on Translations and Commentaries

As I’ve been reading a commentary based on the New Living Translation (NLT), it has been interesting to note how the commentators differ from the readings of the translation on which the commentary is ostensibly based. For example, as I finished reading the section on Numbers today (pp. 217-443), written by Dale A. Brueggemann, I…