A Problem in Translation: Isaiah 3:12
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A Problem in Translation: Isaiah 3:12

Translation challenges Bible translators face, focusing on Isaiah 3:12’s varying interpretations. The passage’s meaning shifts depending on what textual choices one makes and whether one translates literally or figuratively, potentially impacting the modern reader’s understanding. Ultimately, translation choices reflect what translators deem most crucial to convey, with any decision risking some loss of the original message.

Book: The Byzantine Text-Type & New Testament Textual Criticism
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Book: The Byzantine Text-Type & New Testament Textual Criticism

In my business role as president of Energion Publications, I’ve just cleared the proofs for the release of the book The Byzantine Text-Type & New Testament Textual Criticism by Dr. Harry Sturz. This is a reproduction of the original book, released in 1984 and is produced under license from HarperCollins Christian Books. Note: This discussion…

Taint None of Us Perfect, Never, Nohow
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Taint None of Us Perfect, Never, Nohow

(Leave Christology out of it!) Reading the post A Similarity Between Reasoned Eclecticism & Byzantine Priority over on the Evangelical Textual Criticism blog (HT: Dave Black Online, Monday, June 6, 12:35), set me to thinking. Fair warning: This will be a bit rambling. These are thoughts triggered by the post, not largely in response to…

Links and Notes on Textual Criticism
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Links and Notes on Textual Criticism

Jeremy Myers at Redeeming God has an interesting post on textual criticism (HT: Thomas Hudgins). Myers is comparing the textual commentaries written by Bruce Metzger (with input of the UBS committee) and Philip W. Comfort. It’s fun to watch the critical scholars disagree! If anyone believes I consider that a negative comment on critical scholars,…

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Quote: Philosophers Talk in Obscure Ways

I thought of this quote as I was preparing for my study on John tonight: Philosophers sometimes appear to talk in obscure ways. They do so because they take into consideration what people often overlook. If a poet (Longfellow) can say, ‘things are not what they seem’, the philosopher will give reasons why. The fact…